Thursday, November 4, 2010

Art on the Farm

 Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

When Sean Scherer bought an old 1,000 square foot, run-down farmhouse, the last thing evident to the visible eye was a work of art.  But to an artist like Mr. Scherer, who is well-known for his Russian Suprematism and American Minimalism style what he saw in his head was different.

  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

Thus his labor of love on a 90 acre farm was born!  “Most people couldn’t see the vision,” Mr. Scherer said of the house. “But frankly, this was what I’d been waiting for my whole life.”


  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

Be-friending the small artistic community in his new neighborhood, he transformed the down at the heel farmhouse into what he saw in his mind's eye.  With the help of his new friends whose occupations ranged from artists, antique dealers, sculptors and architects he rebuilt his home.


  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy


It was important to Mr. Scherer to furnish his home with the humble farm furniture native to the area.  
 
  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

“I don’t care about pedigree,” he said of the 19th-century furniture that fills the farmhouse. “I like the fact that the objects were made for a specific purpose. They may be a little crude but they also usually have clean, modern lines.” 

  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy
His eclectic collection of 19th-century pieces is sprinkled with contemporary art, anatomical sculptures, botanical prints, mercury glass, old mirrors and tintypes that he started collecting when he moved to the area.

  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

His "clutter" doesn't seem as such, more as an artistic display presented to stimulate the mind and senses instead of just another object to dust around!

  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy


  Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

One of the most striking combinations, however, is in the master bathroom whose walls are plastered in Soviet posters bought in Moscow in 1989 and one of his Kasimir Malevich-inspired canvases from the 1990s.  Mr. Scherer wants his home to be a reflection of his beliefs, his art and his lifestyle. 
 

 Photo Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

Art isn't always found in the modern apartments of a big-city metropolis, but often as not tucked away in a small farmhouse in the country.

~Amber 

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Another inspiring peek into the mind of a master! Keep up the good work.